Nearby Attractions

Inverness from the Scottish Gaelic: Inbhir Nis, meaning "Mouth of the River Ness"; is an ancient Cathedral City in the Scottish Highlands. It is regarded as the capital of the Highlands.

 

Inverness lies near two important battle sites: the 11th-century battle of Blàr nam Fèinne against Norway which took place on the Aird and the 18th century Battle of Culloden which took place on Culloden Moor. It is the northernmost city in the United Kingdom and lies within the Great Glen (Gleann Mòr) at its north-eastern extremity where the River Ness enters the Moray Firth.

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Loch Ness

 

Loch Ness is a large, deep, freshwater loch in the Scottish Highlands extending for approximately 37 kilometres (23 miles) southwest of Inverness. Loch Ness is best known for alleged sightings of the cryptozoological Loch Ness Monster, also known affectionately as "Nessie".

Loch Ness is the second largest Scottish loch by surface area at 56 km2 (22 sq mi) after Loch Lomond, but due to its great depth, it is the largest by volume in the British Isles. Its deepest point is 230 m (126 fathoms; 755 ft),[2][3] making it the second deepest loch in Scotland after Loch Morar.

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Inverness Castle

 

Inverness Castle (Scottish Gaelic: Caisteal Inbhir Nis) sits on a cliff overlooking River Ness in Inverness, Scotland. The red sandstone structure evident today was built in 1836 by architect William Burn. It is built on the site of an 11th-century defensive structure.

 

Today, it houses Inverness Sheriff Court. There has been a castle at this site for many centuries. In April 2017 the north tower of the castle was opened to the public as a viewpoint.

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Culloden Battlefield

Experience the powerful emotions of the Battle of Culloden in the visitor centre’s 360-degree battle immersion theatre, which puts you right in the heart of the action.

 

Discover the true story of the 1745 Rising, from both the Jacobite and Government perspectives, in our newly accredited museum, where unique artefacts from the time are displayed.

Join a guided tour of the battlefield where an expert guide will lead you around the key areas of action on Culloden Moor, as well as visiting the memorial cairn around which lie the graves of 1,500 fallen Jacobite soldiers.

 

See the restored 18th-century Leanach Cottage with its beautiful thatched roof, crafted using heather from the battlefield itself.

The North Coast 500

 

The Highlands has become one of the most iconic destinations in Scotland because of the NC500. Bringing together a route of just over 500 miles of stunning coastal scenery, the North Coast 500, naturally follows the main roads along the coastal edges of the North Highlands of Scotland, taking in the regions of Wester Ross, Sutherland, Caithness, Easter Ross, the Black Isle and Inverness-Shire.

The route begins and ends in Inverness at Inverness Castle which, perched on top of a hill, is the perfect starting point to the route and offers unparalleled views from its viewing tower over the capital city of the Highlands. The NC500 was launched only 3 years ago, yet in that time, it has reached a global audience of over 2.3 billion and ranked by so many independent sources as the best road trip on the planet.

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The Isle of Skye

 

The Isle of Skye is one of the top locations in Scotland to visit. It is famous for its scenery and landscapes that will take your breath away.

 

Inverness is the perfect place to stay when you are travelling to or returning from a trip to Skye.

 

The Island is 50 miles long and the largest of the Inner Hebrides. The capital is Portree. Villages in the north of the Island include Dunvegan, Edinbane, Uig and Staffin.